By k | May 22, 2017 - 6:00 am - Posted in Marketing

I was helping a buddy yesterday
craft her marketing copy
for an upcoming book.

One of the things
we worked on
was deciding
which ONE emotion to focus on
and then crafting copy
that intensified that emotion.

Why one emotion?

Because if we focus on two
or three or four emotions,
it decreases the impact
and usually results
in the prospect feeling nothing.

I spend my entire day
every day
trying to invoke emotions in people.
That is what great writing is.
And I still find it damn difficult.

Look at your marketing copy.
Study the power words,
the words that make an impact.
Do they all invoke the same emotion?

By k | May 21, 2017 - 6:00 am - Posted in New Business Development

Yesterday, I was
in an absolutely terrible mood.
I hated everything
and everyone.
Hey, that happens
and that is okay.
We’re human.

When I’m in a bad mood,
I intentionally disconnect
from the world around me.

I’m usually super busy.
This disconnect often causes
a delay.

But I know if I contact
XXX
while I’m in a grumpy mood,
I’ll damage our relationship.
That damage could take
a lifetime to repair.

It is more ‘efficient’
to delay the contact
for an hour, three hours, a day
until I’m in a better place emotionally.

When I worked in an office,
I would make an excuse
and go home
(or take an extended lunch
or simply a walk,
whatever worked).

If you can’t emotionally deal
with a situation right now,
don’t.

By k | May 20, 2017 - 6:00 am - Posted in New Business Development

One of the things
I love about the writing business is
it is so critical;
I never have to worry
about becoming overconfident.

Overconfidence is a success killer.
If we think we’re skilled
in an area
and we truly suck at it,
we don’t usually feel
a need to improve in this area.
We never get more skilled.

Carmine Gallo
shares

“In 1999,
Cornell University psychology professors
David Dunning and Justin Kruger
wrote a paper titled:
“Unskilled and unaware of it.”

They found that,
in many domains,
people tend to overestimate their skills.

Those same people are hit
with a double whammy.
They are the last to notice
their lack of skills.

According to the researchers,
they performed poorly
relative to their peers
and “were utterly unaware of this fact.”"

Search out feedback
on every area,
even the areas
you believe you’re skilled at.

By k | May 19, 2017 - 6:00 am - Posted in New Business Development

It is very challenging
to keep anything a secret
in today’s world.
Everyone is connected.
Almost everyone has a phone
with a camera and video.
There are Google alerts
and apps
to follow any subject closely.

And you can be certain
your employees
and partners
are following your business
closely.

Information is usually better
coming from your own lips.
You can influence
how it is received.

Chris Ruisi,
founder and CEO,
The Coach’s Zone
shares

“…if you have bad news to tell,
tell it!

Never try to spin the truth
or the facts
to make delivering the message
easier for you.

Stay focused on the issue at hand
and don’t let other issues or challenges
distract you from your outcome.

Never let a difficult personality
get in the way of
communicating the right message.

Remember,
making the decision
is the easy part.
Getting everyone with different views
to buy in and comply
is the real test of a leader.”

If you have bad news,
share it.

By k | May 18, 2017 - 6:00 am - Posted in Corporate Games

When I was graduating
from high school,
I had a major melt down
because I felt I had
to decide
right then, right there
what I would do
for the rest of my life.

What if I decided wrong
and I was stuck
in a job I hated?
What if I wanted to have
three careers?
Could I only choose one?

Thankfully, a mentor sat down with me
and changed the question.
She asked me,
“What do I want to do FIRST?”

THAT question I could answer.
And yes, I’ve been fortunate
to have many careers.
Almost everyone in my generation
and future generations
have.

When asking a child,
“What do you want to be
when you grow up?”,
remember to add
“You can choose more than one.”

THAT is the world we now live in.

By k | May 17, 2017 - 6:00 am - Posted in New Business Development

I make mistakes
every single day.
Some of these mistakes
are bad decisions.
I might be not as informed
as I should be
or I could be misinformed
or I could,
as Seth Godin mentions,
be looking at the short term,
not the long term.

Seth Godin
shares

“A bad decision isn’t only bad
because we’re uninformed or dumb.
It can be bad
because we are swayed
by short-term comfort
and ignore long-term implications.

A bad decision feels good
in the short run,
the heartfelt decision
of someone who means well.
But there’s a gap
when we get to the long run.”

The good news is…
almost all bad decisions
can be undone.
That requires sucking up our pride
but it is usually worth it.

And remember to look at
both the short time
and the long term
implications of decisions.

By k | May 16, 2017 - 6:00 am - Posted in New Business Development

A real estate developer
who says he has no ties
to Russia
is lying.

It is almost impossible
to operate in
that industry
without meeting someone
from both the Russian mob
and the Italian mob.

I worked in real estate development
for only a year
at a very low level
and I met dozens of people
from those two groups.

And it is very easy
to prove ties.
A few emails
with anyone Russian.
A few photos, again,
with anyone Russian.
Done.

A better response
is saying
“I have no ties with
XXX.”
or
“I have never spoken
with Russia about YYY.”
THAT could be the truth
and is more difficult to disprove.

Be specific.

By k | May 15, 2017 - 6:00 am - Posted in New Business Development

A writer I know
is always complaining
about something.
She doesn’t want help.
She merely wants
to vent.

The problem is…
she frames it
in the form of a question.
“Why are boxed sets
only open to bestselling writers?”
“Why won’t readers
review my books?”
“Why isn’t my book selling
a gazillion copies?”

When you ask a question,
you usually get answers.
You attract the attention
of people who genuinely care
and want to help you.
They spend time and effort
doing this.
Only to have that answer
brushed aside.

Which makes them
less likely to help you
in the future
and, ironically, gives you
more things to complain about.

When you want to complain,
don’t do it
in the form of a question.
Save your questions
for when you truly want answers.

By k | May 14, 2017 - 6:00 am - Posted in Marketing

Today is Mother’s Day
in North America.

You might be thinking…
My business has nothing
to do with Mother’s Day.
I don’t have any products or services
to give as gifts.
Mothers aren’t really my target market.

But EVERY customer you have,
every prospect you have,
has a mother.
Most of them
LOVE their moms.
They enjoy talking about
their moms.
They enjoying treating
their moms.

This creates an unprecedented
marketing opportunity.
All of your customers,
all of your prospects are aligned.

Do something today.
That something can be
as small as posting
on social media
about your favorite memory
of your own mom.
But do it.

By k | May 13, 2017 - 6:00 am - Posted in New Business Development

I resisted self-publishing
for years.
I was certain I needed
a traditional publisher.
I was certain a
big New York publisher
was the way to go.

Then I wrote a story
no publisher wanted,
a story my agent
wouldn’t even shop to publishers.

I loved this story.
I thought readers
would love it also.

I was forced to self-publish it.

It is my best selling,
highest earning story
of all time.

I also discovered
I LOVED self-publishing.
It would take quite a bit
for me to return to
a traditional publisher.

I went from curling my top lip
at self-publishing
to embracing it
with everything I had.

I won’t lie.
It was hard to admit
I was wrong.
Friends gave me a rough time
about it.
But it was worth it.
Changing my mind
about self-publishing
was the best thing career-wise
I could have done.

Seth Godin
shares

“The reason
it’s difficult to learn
something new
is that it will change you
into someone
who disagrees with
the person you used to be.”

The benefit of
learning and accepting
new things
is worth the challenge
of admitting you’re wrong.